News Updates From Sarah

Sarah’s Column on Heroic Woman Pilot,
Tammie Jo Shults, Makes the Big Time

The Cleveland Plain Dealer ran my Guest Column, “Pioneering women pilots of WWII would be proud of Tammie Jo”, Friday April 27 when I was in town to deliver a talk about the WASP at the International Women’s Air & Space Museum.

Needless to say, I was thrilled.

Want to read it? Here is a link that should get you to it. www.cleveland.com

GREAT Review for Finding Dorothy Scott

Many many thanks to Nan Siegel for her very favorable review of Finding Dorothy Scott in the May issue of Aviation History magazine.

Thanks, too, to editor Carl von Wodtke for sending me a PDF of the page and two copies of the magazine.

My WASP biography Finding Dorothy Scott earned five awards in 2017 including the winner’s Gold sticker from Story Circle Network — the Sarton Award for biography — and from the Colorado Independent Publishers Award (CIPA) also for biography.

Dorothy received Finalist Silvers stickers from the Colorado Book Award (biography), the WILLA from Women Writing the West (scholarly nonfiction), and the Foreword INDIE (adult nonfiction). Published by Texas Tech University Press, 2016.

WASP of the Ferry Command
Awarded First Place, Nonfiction

WASP of the Ferry Command, published by the University of North Texas Press, won first place for 2018 in The Marjorie Davis Roller Nonfiction Award, given by the National League of American Pen Women, Inc. That was worth a hundred bucks. Not all bad!

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BJ Erickson: WASP Pilot

BJ and Nancy Love flew Genevieve, a much-patched-up, war-weary B-17, to the graveyard — with loving care. She had to be flown at a greatly reduced airspeed because of a large red sign on the instrument panel that read, DO NOT RETRACT LANDING GEAR.

“Along the entire route, we tried to ignore intruders that flew by us and signaled — in a superior manner — that we’d forgotten to pull the landing gear up,” Nancy wrote. “We strongly suspected that the epithet ‘women drivers’ was being directed at us along with their hand signals.”

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Finding Dorothy Scott

“Oh, Pop, we made a nighttime formation take off between smudge pots lining the runways. I’ll never in all my life forget that ride! We were nearly touching the other plane, guided only by small lights and the flare of the exhaust. The rapidly fading field looked like a million small fires.”
Dorothy’s letters put you in the aircraft with her. Her voice transcends the years.

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WASP of the Ferry Command

Personal stories from 40 daring women who lived the story that IS the legacy of the Ferrying Division, Air Transport Command: Decades ahead of their time, these women ferried the Army’s newest aircraft to the docks to be shipped abroad to the battlefront — or wherever else in the U.S. they might be needed.

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Flight to Destiny
Fiction

Fly the skies over America with three fictional heroines, Annie, Clare and Midge, who become WASP ferry pilots. Meet them on December 7, 1941, and live WWII with them into summer 1945. Through them, you will get to know real-life WASP leaders Nancy Love and Jackie Cochran.

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Nancy Batson Crews

“Nancy’s story comes straight from my heart. We were best friends her final year. She flew P-47s, P-51s, heroic stuff to this child of WWII! Nancy chose me to write the story of her beloved WAFS. THE ORIGINALS is as much her book as it is mine. Then I chose to write her story — the sometimes painful but inspirational portrait of a patriot.” – Sarah Byrn Rickman, 2017

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Nancy Love and the WASP

Nancy Love, with General William H. Tunner, created THE workable concept for women pilots to ferry aircraft for the US military and successfully led her WASP to do just that. By September 1944, she had 134 civilian women pilots delivering three-fifths of all single-engine pursuit aircraft coming off factory assembly lines.
How? Read her story and find out.

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Flight from Fear
Fiction

Lacy Stearns swallows her fear of flying to become a WASP and fly in place of her husband who dies in a B-24 crash early in the war. She and her friends fly, live, love and, because it is wartime, lose loved ones. World War II tested the mettle of a generation — men and women. The WASP were not found wanting.

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The Originals

Twenty-eight women with at least 500 flying hours, commercial licenses and 200-horsepower ratings, answered their country’s call and joined the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron. Founder Nancy Love led them from flying trainers to ferrying fighters to U.S. ports for shipment to combat. Personal stories and history blend in this first book about the WAFS.

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a few words from
Sarah Byrn Rickman:

That I write about the WASP — the Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II — is no secret.

For four incredible years, thanks to the influence of the WASP, I flew this little Aeronca Champ taildragger that I dearly loved. It is yellow with a red belly. Pictured at left: me and the Champ, November 15, 2010, the day I did my cross-country solo.

In my wildest dreams I fly a P-51 like my heroines, the WASP of the Ferry Command.

I asked Jenny Hancey, my graphic designer to create the logo at the top of this site for me — an old fashioned pen drawing a P-51 in flight. “Flight to Destiny” is borrowed from my WAFS novel of the same name — because we are allowed to dream.

So I invite you to come along and dream with me. More WASP books are coming as I do my darnedest to tell their incredible stories.

CLICK BELOW TO VIEW SARAH’S SCHEDULED APPEARANCES!

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Air Transport Command
World War II
Click on the ATC patch to read Sarah’s thumbnail history of the WAFS/WASP

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Click on the wings to read Sarah’s poem On Wings of Gold